Articles Posted in Nevada Supreme Court

by
Appellant, a Nevada political action committee, sought to enact a law through Nevada's ballot initiative process to provide a new funding sources for the state's public school K-12 education need. The proposed law, entitled "The Education Initiative" would impose a two-percent margin tax on all Nevada businesses with annual revenue of more than $1 million. Respondent filed a complaint challenging the Initiative. After finding that Initiative's description of effect was misleading, the district court granted the requested relief in part by enjoining the Secretary of State from presenting the Initiative to the Legislature. The Supreme Court reversed in part the district court's order invalidating the Initiative, holding that the description of effect at issue in this case satisfied the requirement that the description contain a straightforward, succinct, and nonargumentative statement of what the Initiative will accomplish and how it will achieve those goals. View "Educ. Initiative PAC v. Comm. to Protect Nev. Jobs" on Justia Law

by
In 2008, the Association of Community Organizations for Reform Now, Inc. (ACORN) hired voter registration canvassers in Las Vegas. Under an incentive program, ACORN paid canvassers $5 a bonus if the canvasser returned twenty-one or more voter registration applications. The State subsequently charged ACORN and the supervisor of ACORN's field director for Nevada with several counts of violating Nev. Rev. Stat. 293.805, which prohibits providing compensation to voter registration canvassers based upon the total number of voters a canvasser registers. The supervisor entered an Alford plea to two counts of conspiracy to commit the crime of compensation for registration of voters, and was adjudged guilty. The Supreme Court affirmed, holding (1) section 293.805 triggers a less exacting standard of review than strict scrutiny; (2) the State demonstrated an interest sufficiently weighty to justify the limitation imposed on canvassing activities, and therefore, section 293.805 does not violate the First Amendment; and (3) section 293.805 is not unconstitutionally vague. View "Busefink v. State" on Justia Law

by
Respondent Arthur E. Mallory was Churchill County's district attorney. Appellant John O'Connor is an elector and registered voter within Churchill County. In this appeal, the issue before the Supreme Court was the narrow question of whether the office of district attorney is a state office for the purpose of determining whether district attorneys are subject to term limits under the "state office" portion of Article 15, Section 3(2) of the Nevada Constitution. Reviewing the Constitution as a whole, the Supreme Court's resolution of this inquiry was controlled by Article 4, Section 32 of the Constitution, which plainly declares district attorneys to be "county officers." Because Article 4, Section 32 identifies district attorneys as county officers, it follows that the office of district attorney cannot be considered a "state office" for term-limits purposes, and thus, district attorneys are not subject to term limits under the "state office" portion of Article 15, Section 3(2). Accordingly, the Court affirmed the district court's order denying appellant's petition to set aside respondent's election to a consecutive term as the Churchill County District Attorney. View "In re Contested Election of Mallory" on Justia Law